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Butterflies in the wider countryside England

DataSet on Butterflies from Europe

These statistics on widespread butterflies on farmland and in woodland in England contribute to a suite of indicators due to be updated later this year (the Biodiversity 2020 indicators for England); earlier data availability allows their release ahead of that publication. The measures for butterflies on farmland and in woodland are multi-species indices compiled by Butterfly Conservation (BC) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) from data collated through the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS) and the Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey (WCBS). The indicators use data from butterfly transect sites on farmland and in woodland from the UKBMS and additionally randomly selected farmland plots from the WCBS. Further details of the methods used to compile the indicators and assess change can be found on the UK BMS website. More information about farmland and woodland indicators is available on the England biodiversity indicators homepage.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/butterflies-in-the-wider-countryside-england
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Butterflies in the wider countryside UK

DataSet on Butterflies from Europe

These indicators on butterflies in the United Kingdom contribute to a suite of indicators due to be updated later this year (the UK Biodiversity Indicators); earlier data availability allows their release ahead of that publication. Two measures of annual butterfly population abundance are presented: the first for specialist butterflies (species strongly associated with semi-natural habitats such as unimproved grassland) and the second for butterflies found in both semi-natural habitats and the wider countryside. The measures are multi-species indices compiled by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) from data collated through the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UK BMS) and the Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey (WCBS). The indicators use data from butterfly transect sites on farmland and in woodland from the UK BMS and additionally randomly selected farmland plots from the WCBS. Further details of the methods used to compile the indicators and assess change can be found on the UK BMS website. More information about this indicator is available on the JNCC website.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/butterflies-in-the-wider-countryside-uk
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Wild bird populations in England

Research on Birds from Europe

Bird populations have long been considered to provide a good indication of the broad state of wildlife in England. This is because they occupy a wide range of habitats and respond to environmental pressures that also operate on other groups of wildlife. In addition there are considerable long-term data on changes in bird populations, which help in the interpretation of shorter term fluctuations in numbers.

The bird population indices have been compiled in conjunction with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC).

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/wild-bird-populations-in-england
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Wild bird populations in the UK

Research on Birds from Europe

Bird populations have long been considered to provide a good indication of the broad state of wildlife in the UK. This is because they occupy a wide range of habitats and respond to environmental pressures that also operate on other groups of wildlife. In addition there are considerable long-term data on changes in bird populations, which help in the interpretation of shorter term fluctuations in numbers.

The bird population indices have been compiled in conjunction with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC).

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/wild-bird-populations-in-the-uk
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SNP discovery and characterisation in White Rhino (Ceratotherium simum) with application to parentage assignment

DataSet on White Rhino from Across the World

The white rhino is one of the great success stories of modern wildlife conservation, growing from as few as 50-100 animals in the 1880s, to approximately 20,000 white rhinoceros remaining today. However, illegal trade in conversational rhinoceros horns is adding constant pressure on remaining populations. Captive management of ex situ populations of endangered species using molecular methods can contribute to improving the management of the species. Here we compare for the first time the utility of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and nine micro satellites (MS) in isolation and in combination for assigning parentage in captive White Rhinoceros. We found that a combined data set of SNPs and micro satellites was most informative with the highest confidence level. This study thus provided us with a useful set of SNP and MS markers for parentage and relatedness testing. Further assessment of the utility of these markers over multiple (> three) generations and the incorporation of a larger variety of relationships among individuals (e.g. half-siblings or cousins) is strongly suggested.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5409770/
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Annotated Honey Bee Images

Other on Annotated Honey Bee from North America

This dataset contains 5,100+ bee images annotated with location, date, time, subspecies, health condition, caste, and pollen.

The original batch of images was extracted from still time-lapse videos of bees. By averaging the frames to calculate a background image, each frame of the video was subtracted against that background to bring out the bees in the forefront. The bees were then cropped out of the frame so that each image has only one bee. Because each video is accompanied by a form with information about the bees and hive, the labeling process is semi-automated. Each video results in differing image crop quality levels. This dataset will be updated biweekly as more videos and data become available.

-1 means the information is coming soon.

https://www.kaggle.com/jenny18/honey-bee-annotated-images/home
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British Birdsong Dataset

Other on British birds from Europe

Birds use songs and calls of varying length and complexity to attract mates, warn of nearby danger and mark their territory. This data set contains a recordings of different birdsong from bird species that can be found in Britain (although the recordings themselves are from many different locations).

The data set contains bird sound recordings, a specific subset gathered from the Xeno Canto collection to form a balanced data set across 88 species commonly heard in the United Kingdom. It was originally compiled by            Dan Stowell and shared on Archive.org.

The copyright in each audio file is owned by the user who donated the file to Xeno Canto. Please see “birdsong_metadata.tsv” for the full listing, which gives the authors’ names and the CC licences applicable for each file. The audio files are encoded as .flac files.

https://www.kaggle.com/rtatman/british-birdsong-dataset/home
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10 Monkey Species

Other on Monkeys from Across the World

The data set is an image data set for fine-grain classification of monkeys. of two files, training and validation. Each folder contains 10 subfolders labeled as n0~n9, each corresponding a species form Wikipedia’s monkey cladogram. Images are 400×300 px or larger and JPEG format (almost 1400 images). Images were downloaded with help of the googliser open source code.

https://www.kaggle.com/slothkong/10-monkey-species/home
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Population Estimates of Black Rhinoceros from Various Sources

Survey on Black Rhinoceros from Across the World, Africa

The black rhino weighs 800 – 1400 kg (1760 – 3080 lb). Its height varies from 1.3 – 1.8 m (4.3 – 5.9′). The black rhino has 2 horns.  Its skin is dark yellow-brown to dark brown or dark gray. The black rhino occurs in a wide variety of habitats, from desert areas in Namibia to wetter forested areas in the highlands of Kenya, to savannas and bushveld areas where the highest densities of black rhino occur. T

Black rhinos are predominantly solitary, the most commonly observed groups being lone males or adult females with young. Black rhinos that share a part or all or their range exhibit a familiarity with one another instead of the aggression that they exhibit to total strangers.

The black rhino was formerly found in suitable habitat over most of Africa south of the Sahara, from southwestern Angola across the Cape Province up to East Africa and north, avoiding the Congo Basin and its rain forests, to Somalia and southwestern Ethiopia, then westward along a strip between the Sahara and the Congo and Nigerian forests to the region of Lake Chad. Their population suffered an enormous reduction from a probable several hundred thousand at the start of the 20th century to less than 2,500 by the early 1990s. However, since 1995, black rhino numbers at a continental level have started increasing again. Hunting and clearance of land for settlement and agriculture were the major reasons for the decline of black rhino populations in the 20th century. The situation facing the black rhino is still critical. The demand for rhino horn from Asia (for traditional medicines) and from the Middle East (for dagger handles) persists, and the threat of a return to large-scale poaching is still present.

http://www.animalinfo.org/species/artiperi/dicebico.htm#Population
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Red Panda

Survey on Red Panda from Asia

The red panda (which is much smaller than the giant panda) resembles a raccoon in size and appearance. The red panda weighs 3 – 6 kg (7 – 13 lb). It lives in mountain forests with a bamboo understory, at altitudes generally between 1500 and 4800 m (5000 – 15,700′). Red pandas almost exclusively eat bamboo. They are good tree climbers and spend most of their time in trees when not foraging. A female red panda picks a location such as a tree hollow or rock crevice for a maternal den, where she will bear 1 – 5 young. Red pandas are solitary, except for the mating period and the time when a mother and its young are together.

The red panda is found in a mountainous band from Nepal through northeastern India and Bhutan and into China, Laos and northern Myanmar. It is rare and continues to decline. It has already become extinct in 4 of the 7 Chinese provinces in which it was previously found. The major threats to red pandas are loss and fragmentation of habitat due to deforestation (and the resulting loss of bamboo) for timber, fuel and agricultural land; poaching for the pet and fur trades; and competition from domestic livestock.

http://www.animalinfo.org/species/carnivor/ailufulg.htm
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